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Clothing & Shelter

    Results: 19

  • Animal Shelters (1)
    PD-7600.0600

    Animal Shelters

    PD-7600.0600

    Programs that provide protection and care for unwanted pets or stray animals, and hold them for a specified period of time to provide an opportunity for owners to claim them prior to offering them for adoption. Included are shelters that euthanize the animals if not adopted within a specified amount of time, as well as "no kill" shelters that will keep the animals until they are adopted.
  • Assisted Living Facilities (2)
    BH-8400.6000-060

    Assisted Living Facilities

    BH-8400.6000-060

    Residential facilities specially constructed or converted to combine housing and supportive services in a "homelike" environment with the goal of maximizing the individual functioning and autonomy of residents. Assisted living facilities generally have private apartment-style accommodations with walk in showers, wide doors for wheelchair access, emergency pull cord systems and other special amenities; and offer the individualized array of personal care services which will allow each resident to function as independently as possible. Services vary from facility to facility, but usually include three meals a day with special diets, as required; housekeeping and linen services; personal laundry; social and recreational activities; transportation to medical appointments, stores and community services; money management assistance; assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living; medication management and administration; therapy and pharmacy services; and wellness and exercise programs. Assisted living facilities may be licensed by the state or may not require a license depending on the area in which they are located.
  • Clothing (19)
    BM-6500.1500

    Clothing

    BM-6500.1500

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing. Included are clothing exchange programs.
  • Cold Weather Shelters/Warming Centers (36)
    TH-2600.1580-140

    Cold Weather Shelters/Warming Centers

    TH-2600.1580-140

    Programs that provide daytime, evening and/or overnight accommodations during times of extreme cold for people who are temporarily at risk for exposure due to a power failure, fuel shortage, road closure, homelessness or other situations which make them vulnerable.
  • Continuing Care Retirement Communities (2)
    BH-8400.6000-150

    Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    BH-8400.6000-150

    Residential facilities, usually licensed by the state, which combine all three levels of care (independent living, assisted living and nursing home care) in a single setting. CCRCs offer older adults long-term contracts which guarantee a place to live and access to specified personal and health care services. Residences may be apartments, townhouses, duplexes, clusters or single family homes and offer differing arrays of service, usually including a common dining room, exercise and activity areas, outdoor recreation and swimming pools. New residents are expected to move into the community when they are healthy and able to maintain an independent lifestyle, and may be asked to pay a sizable entry fee plus monthly maintenance fees, may have the option of a month to month rental arrangement or may purchase and develop equity in the property. Depending on the contract, specified health services may be covered by the entry fee, may be included in the maintenance fees or may be paid for at the time of need. The monthly fee also covers meals, housekeeping, linen and personal laundry, utilities and other basic services.
  • Furniture (5)
    BM-3000.2000

    Furniture

    BM-3000.2000

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand sofas, chairs, tables, beds, dressers and other necessary home furnishings.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (3)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.3000

    Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.3000

    Programs that provide affordable, community-based housing for individuals and families who have experienced long-term or chronic homelessness and have been diagnosed as having a physical or developmental disability, a severe mental illness, substance abuse problems or HIV/AIDS; or are members of another designated group within the homeless population. Structures may include apartments, single-family houses, duplexes, group homes or single-room occupancy housing. Permanent supportive housing programs generally provide residents with the rights of tenancy under state or local landlord/tenant laws and are linked to services designed to meet residents' needs. Supportive services vary depending on the resident population. Most programs offer some type of case management and housing support, but may also offer more intensive mental health, substance abuse, vocational, employment or other services which help promote independent living. Supportive services may be offered on-site or off-site, or be provided by a mobile service team.
  • Homeless Shelter (3)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Housing Counseling (3)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Housing Discrimination Assistance (1)
    FT-1800.3000

    Housing Discrimination Assistance

    FT-1800.3000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who believe that they have been denied an opportunity to purchase, lease or rent the home or apartment of their choice due to their age, gender, family composition (including families with children under the age of 18 and pregnant women), race or color, nationality, religion, disability, sexual orientation or marital status, actions that are prohibited by the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the federal Fair Housing Act Amendments Act of 1988 in the U.S. Federal fair housing law also extends limited protection to recovering alcoholics who actively and regularly participate in a medically based treatment or AA program, and people with a drug use disorder including those who have prior convictions for illegal drug use (but not for drug dealing or manufacture). Assistance may also be available to other individuals who are protected from housing discrimination by state or local laws with a broader set of protected categories, or which cover properties that are exempt from federal fair housing laws but are protected under state law.
  • Housing Expense Assistance (6)
    BH-3800

    Housing Expense Assistance

    BH-3800

    Programs that pay current housing bills or finance new living accommodations for people who are otherwise unable to provide for their housing needs. Housing expense assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing (4)
    BH-7000.4600

    Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600

    Housing programs that make rental housing more readily available to homeless people and/or low-income individuals and families (those below 50% of the area's median income). Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.
  • Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.6000

    Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.6000

    Residential facilities for older adults and/or people with disabilities who are unable to function in an independent living environment because they need assistance with toileting, bathing, dressing, medication management and administration, meals and housekeeping and other activities of daily living, but do not require nursing care on a regular basis. Living options range from state institutions for individuals with the most severe disabilities who require intensive services to settings that enable individuals with disabilities to live with their own families or in their own homes or apartments with supportive services from community-based supported living providers. Alternatives in between include health care facilities for people with a primary need for developmental services in combination with an intermittent need for skilled nursing care; community care facilities (residential care homes or group homes) for people who require varying levels of supervision and assistance in the activities of daily living; assisted living facilities; continuing care retirement communities; life care communities; foster family placements for adults who will benefit from interaction in a family environment; and semi-independent living facilities for individuals with disabilities who need minimal levels of support to live and work in the community. Some of these facilities are licensed by the state.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Section 8 Housing/Rental Assistance (1)
    BH-3900.3050-750

    Section 8 Housing/Rental Assistance

    BH-3900.3050-750

    Programs that maintain lists of available rental housing that is owned or managed by individuals who have agreed to accept tenants who have Section 8 certificates from the local housing authority or finance agency, or rental assistance certificates from other federal, state or locally funded rental assistance programs. Included is information that is available online, in print or in other formats.
  • Sexual Assault Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-800

    Sexual Assault Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-800

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have been victimized by rape and/or other forms of sexual assault. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and significant other counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to sexual assault including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (6)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter for Single Mothers (1)
    BH-8600 * YK-6500.8000-830

    Transitional Housing/Shelter for Single Mothers

    BH-8600 * YK-6500.8000-830

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter.

    Women who are unmarried, widowed, separated or divorced and who have parental responsibility for one or more children. Included are women, who for a variety of reasons, have chosen to have one or more children without a partner.